Authors: michael conrad

ᏔᎵᏍᎪᎯᏁᎢ ᎠᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ

2020-03-26 Michael Conrad  21 minute read

ᎦᏬᏂᏍᎬᎢ ᎠᎦᏔᎲᎢ (Grammar)

Remember that it is through the exercises in the lesson material that you will learn how to understand and speak Cherokee, not by memorizing rules and word parts.

The Cherokee words for “is”, “was”, and “will be” work a little differently than they do in English. The words have special forms to indicate just now, now and on going, usually, a while ago, first hand knowledge, and second hand knowledge.

The special first hand and second hand knowledge forms will be indicated by references to “with personal knowledge” and “without personal knowledge”. “With personal knowledge” indicates being a first hand witness. “Without personal knowledge” indicates being told something by someone else making your information second hand.

In some materials you will see these words grouped together as one and referred to as “the copula”.

ᏐᏁᎳᏚᏏᏁᎢ ᎠᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ

2020-03-26 Michael Conrad  26 minute read

ᎦᏬᏂᏍᎬᎢ ᎠᎦᏔᎲᎢ (Grammar)

Remember that it is through the exercises in the lesson material that you will learn how to understand and speak Cherokee, not by memorizing rules and word parts.

The following two new bound pronouns are used in this lesson.

  • They … me.

    • ᎬᎩ̣-, ᎬᏆ͓- (gv²gị-, gv²gw-)
  • They … you.

    • ᎨᏣ̣- (ge²jạ-)

ᏁᎳᏚᏏᏁᎢ ᎠᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ

2020-03-26 Michael Conrad  21 minute read

ᎦᏬᏂᏍᎬᎢ ᎠᎦᏔᎲᎢ (Grammar)

Remember that it is through the exercises in the lesson material that you will learn how to understand and speak Cherokee, not by memorizing rules and word parts.

You were previously introduced to the special combination of Ꮭ/ᏱᎩ to indicate “isn’t”.

  • Ꮭ _____ ᏱᎩ [hla _____ yi⁴gi]

When you use the Cherokee word “ᎥᏝ” and combine it with the special prefix “Ᏹ-” you create a negative sentence.

ᎦᎵᏆᏚᏏᏁᎢ ᎠᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ

2020-03-26 Michael Conrad  21 minute read

ᎦᏬᏂᏍᎬᎢ ᎠᎦᏔᎲᎢ (Grammar)

Remember that it is through the exercises in the lesson material that you will learn how to understand and speak Cherokee, not by memorizing rules and word parts.

Each of the action words that you have learned so far are composed of two main parts. A base word which indicates “an action” and one or more prefixes which are used to indicate “who and whom”. The following list shows this information for the forms of ᎠᎪᏩᏘᎭ you have been using.

Reminder: Cherokee does not differentiate based on sexual gender. Where you see “he” or “him” in the following you can substitute “she” or “her”.

ᏓᎳᏚᏏᏁᎢ ᎠᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ

2020-03-26 Michael Conrad  9 minute read

ᎦᏬᏂᏍᎬᎢ ᎠᎦᏔᎲᎢ (Grammar)

Remember that it is through the exercises in the lesson material that you will learn how to understand and speak Cherokee, not by memorizing rules and word parts.

As demonstrated by your exercises in previous chapters, many Cherokee words for animals, plants, places and things do not change form when used in a plural sense. They work like the English words “deer” or “buffalo”.

However, most Cherokee words used to describe things do change form to indicate plurality and animacy. Such words include those which indicate color, size, shape, texture, and so on.

ᏍᎩᎦᏚᏏᏁᎢ ᎠᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ

2020-03-26 Michael Conrad  9 minute read

ᏘᎪᎵᏯ (Read them)

When talking about multiple animate things, the prefix ᎠᏂ- is added if the word doesn’t start with Ꭴ:

  • ᎠᏂᏤᎢ
    [ạ²ni²je⁴ɂi] “Green of fruit or vegetable.”

  • ᎠᏂᏤᎢᏳᏍᏗ
    [ạ²ni²je³ɂị²yu⁴sdi] “Green colored.”

  • ᎠᏂᎩᎦᎨᎢ
    [ạ²ni²gi²³gạ³ge⁴ɂi] “Red.”

ᏂᎦᏚᏏᏁᎢ ᎠᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ

2020-03-26 Michael Conrad  11 minute read

ᏘᎪᎵᏯ (Read them)

The following color names are used when talking about single inanimate things:

  • ᎢᏤᎢ
    [ị¹je⁴ɂi] “Green of fruit or vegetable.”

  • ᎢᏤᎢᏳᏍᏗ
    [ị²je³ɂị²yu⁴sdi] “Green colored.”

  • ᎤᏁᎦ
    [u²ne⁴ga] “White.”

  • ᎤᏍᎪᎸᎢ
    [u¹sgo²³lv⁴ɂi] “Dim. Faded.”

ᏦᎦᏚᏏᏁᎢ ᎠᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ

2020-03-26 Michael Conrad  6 minute read

ᏘᎪᎵᏯ (Read them)


  • [si] “Wait! All the same (still). Even now (or then) as was formerly (still).”

    • ᏝᏏ, ᎥᏝᏏ
      [hlạ³si, vhlạ³si] “Not all the same (not still). Not now as was formerly (no longer still).”
  • ᎪᎱᏍᏗ, ᎪᏍᏗ
    [go²hu⁴sdi, go⁴sdi] “Something. A thing. Things.”

    • Ꮭ ᎪᎱᏍᏗ
      [hla go²hu⁴sdi] “Not anything. Nothing. No things.”

ᎤᏬᎵᏗ ᎪᏪᎵ (Funny Paper)

Read the following comic aloud. ☞ If you have partners, have one person read aloud all the ᏕᏫᏗ ᏥᏍᏚ and ᏲᎾ ᎠᏍᎦᏯ parts and another the ᏥᏍᏚ ᎠᎨᏳᏣ and ᏲᎾ ᎠᎨᏯ parts. Each person should read aloud both roles at least once.