How asinine!

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How asinine!

Unread postby Paulbb » Fri Jul 31, 2015 4:35 pm

I'm disgusted with the stupid lack of instruction. I own the "beginning Cherokee" book by Holmes and Smith. I read the Eastern tribes learning instructions. none relate what bound pronoun should be coupled with which verb or noun. Pissed, I am!
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Re: How asinine!

Unread postby jiisdu » Mon Aug 03, 2015 10:51 am

Here's my new book that explains Cherokee grammar from a different angle. Check out 'Cherokee Reference Grammar' on Amazon.
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Re: How asinine!

Unread postby magali » Fri Aug 07, 2015 7:41 am

Here's a link the the book: http://amzn.to/1eXk7Kz

Amazon Description wrote:it provides the grammatical foundation upon which all the dialects are based. In his introduction, author Brad Montgomery-Anderson offers a brief account of Cherokee history and language revitalization initiatives, as well as instructions for using this grammar. The book then delves into an explanation of Cherokee pronunciation, orthography, parts of speech, and syntax.

While the book is intended as a reference grammar for experienced scholars, Montgomery-Anderson presents the information in accessible stages, moving from easier examples to more complex linguistic structures. Examples are taken from a variety of sources, including many from the Cherokee Phoenix. Audio clips of various text examples throughout can be found on the accompanying CDs. The volume also includes three appendices: a glossary keyed to the text; a typescript for the audio component; and a collection of literary texts: two traditional stories and a historical account of a search party traveling up the Arkansas River.
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Re: How asinine!

Unread postby magali » Fri Aug 07, 2015 7:49 am

The attached documents might help a little. (Or might just make your life more miserable).

Something to keep in mind. The "stems" are either "Set A" or "Set B" and you have to learn which one each is. This is no different that say in Spanish where you have to learn the "gender" of a word. This applies to nouns which "conjugate", adjectives, and verbs.

Certain usages (past tense, infinitive, etc) always use "Set B" prefixes without regard to whether a verb is "Set A" or "Set B".

-ᎹᎦᎵ
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Re: How asinine!

Unread postby magali » Mon Aug 24, 2015 8:05 pm

Set A vs Set B revisited

Remember that a verb is classified as either a “Set A” word or a “Set B” word.

The Present, Present Habitual, and Imperative forms use either "Set A" or "Set B" bound pronouns as indicated by that form's classification.

The Remote Past and the Infinitive forms use "Set B" pronouns without regard to the verbs classification.

Examples:

Set A verb “agowhtiha”:

• Jịgowhtiha. “I see it.”

– Jị- + -gowhtiha.

• Agigowhtiha. “He/she sees me.”

– Agi- + -gowhtiha.

• Jigowhtiha. “I see him.”

– Ji- + -gowhtiha.

• Agigohvi. “I saw it. He/she saw me.”

– Agi- + -gohvi.

Set B verb “uduliha”:

• Agwaduliha. “I want it. He/she wants me.”

– Agi- + -aduliha.

• Jiyaduliha. “I want him/her.”

– Jiy- + -aduliha.

• Agwadulvhvi. “I wanted it. He wanted me.”

– Agi- + -adulvhvi.

• Jiyadulvhvi. “I wanted him/her.”

– Jiy- + -adulvhvi.
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