Categories: grammar

Bound Pronouns

2020-06-01 Michael Conrad  4 minute read

(App updated 2020-06-10)

This is a custom "flash card" style program to assist with learning the bound pronouns. It has options to display using either Latin, Syllabary, both, or none. The software keeps track of your progress and schedules cards based on how well you do. Cards you have problems with are repeated often. Cards you do well with are not.

The program includes spoken audio (synthetic) for each of the challenges, over 1,800 of them.

A list of glottal stop stems in the Cherokee English Dictionary (CED)

2020-04-13 Cherokee English Dictionary  15 minute read

  • ᎤᏩᎫᎴᎦ
    [u¹wa²ku²³le³²ga] {ɂ} (vi) “he’s belching, burping”

    • ᎠᎩᎫᎴᎦ
      [a¹gi²ku²³le³²ga]

    • ᎤᏩᎫᎴᏨᎢ
      [u¹wa²ku²³le³²jv²³ɂi]

    • ᎤᏩᎫᎴᎪᎢ
      [u¹wa²ku²³le³²go³ɂi]

    • ᏣᎫᎴᎩ
      [ja²ku²le¹gi]

    • ᎤᏩᎫᎴᎢᏍᏗ
      [ụ²wa²ku²³lẹ³ɂị²sdi]

Cherokee Reference Grammar

2020-04-05 Michael Conrad  3 minute read

Amazon Link

The Cherokees have the oldest and best-known Native American writing system in the United States. Invented by Sequoyah and made public in 1821, it was rapidly adopted, leading to nineteenth-century Cherokee literacy rates as high as 90 percent. This writing system, the Cherokee syllabary, is fully explained and used throughout this volume, the first and only complete published grammar of the Cherokee language.

Cherokee Language Grammar - Cherokee Messenger - 1844-1846

2020-04-04 Michael Conrad  107 minute read

Cherokee Language Grammar

Please take note:

  • The following is from the Brief Specimens of Cherokee Grammatical Forms as printed in the The Cherokee Messenger (ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏥᏅᏏᏛ) in the years 1844 to 1846.

  • The original text used ’ds’ for the soft ’ts’ sound. These have been replaced with ’ts’ to be consistent with the entirety of the dictionary. Additionally “qu” has been replaced with “kw” to be consistent with the usage of “gw” in the rest of the text.

  • The following description of Cherokee grammar is for 1840’s Cherokee and not today’s Cherokee. While most differences between the two are minor, there are differences. The material is very useful when working with the Cherokee New Testament, the Cherokee translation of Genesis, the Cherokee translation of Pilgrim’s Progress, and so forth.

  • The English text is also from the 1840’s and has not been “modernized”. It is important to understand that “thee” and “thou” are used to indicate “you one” and that “ye” and “you” are used to indicate “you two or more”.

  • Some re-arrangment of text, tables, and minor changes of wording have happened to facilitate e-book creation.

Cherokee 1 on RSU TV

2020-03-30 Michael Conrad  1 minute read

Cherokee 1 - Spring 2020

Click Here for the Online Language Class

RSU Public TV in partnership with the Cherokee Nation is offering beginner classes teaching the Cherokee Language. These classes are taught by Cherokee Nation language instructor Wade Blevins along with first language speakers as guests throughout the course.